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My wife and meditation

September 20, 2011 by  
Filed under Dan Burke, Meditation, Prayer

My wife loves flowers. She is a beautiful woman inside and out and deserves flowers. Recently, I was driving home and began to think about her. I thought about how she has suffered and overcome. I was musing on her ability to stick with me when deeply fettered with illness, sin, and selfishness. As I pondered her face and her virtue in my mind I was moved to feelings of admiration and love. I decided it was time for flowers again.

It occurred to me that this is a perfect illustration of affective mediation as it plays out in our love relationship with God. When we meditate, we ruminate on the goodness of God and how he has sustained us and continued to love us even as we reject him in so many ways. As we ponder his goodness, kindness, gentleness, and perseverance, our will becomes inflamed. When our will is rightly inflamed to love, we act in service to him.

True meditation always results in living out the love that is inflamed in our hearts.

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About Dan Burke

Dan is the founder of Roman Catholic Spiritual Direction and author of the award winning book, Navigating the Interior Life - Spiritual Direction and the Journey to God. Beyond his “contagious” love for Jesus and His Church, he is a grateful husband and father of four, the Executive Director of and writer for EWTN’s National Catholic Register, a regular co-host on Register Radio, a writer and speaker who provides online spiritual formation and travels to share his conversion story and the great riches that the Church provides us through authentic Catholic spirituality. Dan has been featured on EWTN’s Journey Home program and numerous radio programs. If you have an interest in having Dan come speak at your parish or Catholic event or group, contact us at rcspiritualdirection@gmail.com or call 818-646-7729.

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  • Anonymous

    This IS a good example! 

    Your use of the word “ruminate” reminds me of what my spiritual director told me about Lectio Divina.  He’s a priest at a monastery and Lectio is a big part of their life; breaking it down so that I could better grasp his point, he used the example of cows chewing their cud (We live in the country so I immediately understood this), or ruminating…….bringing back, throughout the day, the particular scripture verse or words that spoke to them during their Lectio time in the morning………….reflecting on all the things that come to mind as we ponder the Word in our hearts…..as you did in remembering your wife’s goodness. 

    As an additional tidbit – I heard somewhere that the original word that was used for ‘ponder’ meant, ‘to piece together’………….I think that’s perfect!!

  • Sandy

    It is good that your thoughts about your wife brought you to the realization that you should get her flowers.  Pondering goodness, kindness, gentleness, and perseverance leads to generosity, giving out of love without counting the cost.  May you continue to ruminate your many blessings and respond accordingly.  This life is way to short not to recognize the goodness in others.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_RERCYQ57LFUA5Z2ZK3GUTYCIPQ Jaygee3

    I agree and all this happens only with the grace of God made possible by the sacrament of matrimony. And your’e one lucky husband; she loves flowers not cars.  

  • claire

    It is truly when we think of “LOVE” and we acting on it toward all whom we love as well as to those whom we have problems, we begin to really see the awesome LOVE God  has been showering to all of His creatures through out the ages, even onto the Death of His Son for our Redemption!   How awesomely perfect and limitless is His love?  We can’t  ever hope to comprehend His Perfection! do  what little we can do for one another with a meditation on Gratitude and Thanksgiving is the way to go!  God bless you!

    • Anonymous

      Thank you and amen

  • WellSpring04

    This commentary points out the very human preoccupation of the mind when doing “mindless” activities, like housework, driving (to some extent), or yardwork. The thing is, this “pondering” or “ruminating” will to some extent be habitually on the same subjects: for many of us, the situations in our lives that we find painful or unresolved. It takes an act of the will, and active feeding of our mind and heart to transform those negative and largely useless activities with strength building mental activity. A prayer to the Holy Spirit, and to Our Mother will transform these continual thoughts to our benefit. Even the charismatic example of saying short prayers reminding us of our dependence on God “Praise you Jesus!” “All honor and glory to you almight God!” and “Jusus Christ I trust in you!” can ensure our attention is not wandering. Good hymns also serve the purpose…
    It is good for me to remember that very little good has come from endlessly dwelling on the darker side of my life. Whereas “pondering” and asking for wisdom in prayer bears a lot of fruit…guess one is attempting to solve the problem by myself, and the other is asking God for help! Wonder which one is more fruitful??!!

  • Christine chateh

    Thanks for this great article! God`S love and kindness is unceasing! And as beautiful as flowers!

  • Anonymous

    This is really beautiful!

  • Anonymous

    Dear Friend: Solid wisdom in your comments.

    • Evarg

      Hi Dan, the other day you mentioned a catholic website with free ebooks. Can you tell me the name? I’ve been looking for that post but I cant find it. Thank you! God Bless.

  • Colleen Sullivan

    beautiful help, thank you

  • Anonymous